Dusi Canoe Marathon

Water shortages no problem for Dusi

2018-02-13 10:48
Dusi

Durban - With the Western and Eastern Cape wrestling with a looming Day Zero and Umgeni Water extending its water restrictions on KwaZulu-Natal, paddlers in this week’s Dusi Canoe Marathon are celebrating the confirmation that there will be enough water in the lower uMngeni River to paddle the final stage into Blue Lagoon on Saturday.

After a gruelling final stage in 2017 when there was no water below Inanda dam, forcing the field to portage all the way to the tidal estuary, the collaboration between Umgeni Water and the KwaZulu-Natal Canoe Union has ensured that there will be seven cubic meters per second (cumecs) in the river system to allow the 1000 paddlers that have entered the race to avoid the 22 kilometres of portaging that was forced on them 12 months ago.

"We work closely with Umgeni Water and the Drought Disaster Committee and they have agreed to give us seven cumecs. We don’t know what seven cumecs is going to be like on the river, but I do believe that the seven cumecs will channel into the deeper part of the river and we will be able to get into Durban, unlike last year,"said Kevin Trodd, the Water Liaison Officer for the KwaZulu-Natal Canoe Union.

"There might be a few places, like Side Chute Rapid and Molweni Rapid, where we have to get out and carry your boats over, but I do believe we will be able to get to Durban a lot easier than the last Dusi.

"The good years will come again."

The water is part of a carefully controlled ecological release, and was confirmed after the latest review of the major dams across the province found them to be roughly ten percent fuller than they were at the corresponding time last year.

Trodd was confident that the committee had come up with a good plan to get maximum benefit from the water available. He said that by planning to start release at midday on Friday, this would ensure that the water moves downriver to below the last rapid before the flatwater section into the finish in Durban.

"This will also give the paddlers a chance later on Friday afternoon to go and look at sections like Tops Needle Rapid and maybe Side Chute to get an idea of what the seven cumec flow will offer them on the final stage," said Trodd.

"This will give a consistent flow throughout the race and make sure that all the paddlers have the same water.

"Based on our calculations, and the experience we have picked up from doing this for some time now, we plan to get the water to below Mango Rapid before the first paddlers get there on Saturday morning."

Race committee head Steve Botha added that the confirmed water was exciting news and a reward for faith that paddlers had in the race after last year’s gruelling final stage.

"We have to understand that the four year drought is a national priority and impacts heavily on the lives of everyone in the country. We are grateful that we have a productive and understanding relationship with Umgeni Water and have been able to contribute in our own way by managing the water from Henley dam for our canoeing races going into Inanda Dam, which is a vital part of the water infrastructure for the region," he added.

Read more on:    dusi canoe marathon
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