News24

Stich hits out at tennis stars

2011-09-20 18:21

London - Top players threatening to strike in protest over a crowded schedule should stop living in a dream world, according to former Wimbledon champion Michael Stich.

Rumblings of discontent have surfaced in recent weeks with world No 4 Andy Murray claiming on Monday that leading players were "not afraid" to consider strike action.

The jam-packed calendar has long been an issue and leading players will meet at the Shanghai Masters next month to discuss their grievances. However, Stich believes they have little to complain about.

"I don't think it's a big issue," the German, who won Wimbledon in 1991, told the BBC. "I think the players forget that all the tournaments out there provide them with jobs.

"They are not playing more than 10 or 15 years ago. It's just like they are running after exhibitions, they are trying to make more money and don't even fulfil their commitments to the smaller tournaments some times.

"They have a shorter season than we used to have. I played singles and doubles and you look at guys like Stefan Edberg they played singles and doubles at Grand Slams and they never complained, they loved it, it was their job.

"Murray doesn't even play four rounds of Davis Cup throughout the year. It's not down to the tournaments and the ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals), it's down to the players themselves. Perhaps they need to look out for their bodies and pick their tournaments better?

"They seem to want to play less but have more prize money and have more influence on the schedule. It's not a dream world out there it's a job and if you take that on you have to deal with the situations you find."

Stich, who also won the Wimbledon and Olympic doubles titles, said the crowded tournament schedule allowed lower-ranked players to earn a living.

"They should never forget that it's a partnership," added Stich. "If they go on strike they should think what about if the tournaments went on strike because then they wouldn't have a job, no income and no career.

"They should get into discussions that are reasonable, which is happening, but to go on strike is not a good solution."

Currently, top-ranked players are obliged to play all four Grand Slams, eight Masters Series events, the ATP World Tour finals should they qualify and a handful of smaller ATP tournaments. On top of that they also have Davis Cup commitments to their countries.

Things came to a head this month at the US Open when bad weather forced players in the bottom half of the draw, which featured both Murray and Rafae Nadal, to play three singles matches in three days just to reach the semi-finals.

While there was little any one could do to stop the rain, Murray said he felt the sport's organisers needed to listen to the concerns of the players over the schedule.

"If we come up with a list of things we want changed, and everyone is in agreement but they don't happen, then we need to have some say in what goes on in our sport. At the moment we don't," Briton Murray said on Monday.

"We'll sit down, talk about it with the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) and International Tennis Federation (ITF), see if they will come to a compromise and, if not, we'll go from there.

"We just want things to change, really small things. Two or three weeks during the year, a few less tournaments each year, which I don't think is unreasonable."

Last November ATP chief Adam Helfant announced that the season would be trimmed by two weeks and a seven-week off-season will be in place from 2012.

This year world No 2 Nadal could find himself playing in December in the Davis Cup final with the 2012 season beginning less than a month later.

Reuters

Comments
  • d54 - 2011-09-20 20:23

    "both Murray and Rafae Nadal, to play three singles matches in three days". For crying out loud I have to play three singles matches a day for 3 days to reach the semis in an open tournament and I am a 70 year old amateur. What part of the word profesional do they not understand.

  • Jaco - 2011-09-21 00:08

    Applause for Stich. Every friggin' job in the world involves sacrifices of some kind, and every honest, reliable worker has to walk extra miles to hang on to his/her source of income. Yes, it's demanding on the pro circuit, but these latterday tennis-celebrities have no idea how fortunate they are to do what they do - even if their shelf-lives are limited - and to earn what they earn. No idea.

  • Gibbonater - 2011-09-21 13:54

    No prob ,then pay these spoiled brats less. Nearly all of them are multi millionares by the age of 23 from winning and sponsership deals and then sneek off to live in tax havens like Monte Carlo etc. This is their job and they are paid huge amounts of money to play, more money than most people will ever earn in a life time of working. I wonder what their sponsors have to say about this. Up yours. If you dont like playing go and get a real job, pay taxes, and pay your own way in life, not live off everyone else.

  • sierra mo - 2011-09-23 16:59

    I DISAGREE WITH STICH THE 1 SLAM WONDER.EDBERG AND YAFELNIKOV (2GREAT SINGLES AND DOUBLES PLAYERS THEMSELVES WILL TELL YOU THAT TODAY'S ERA OF SPEED AND POWER,AND THE LENGTH THAT THE PLAYERS RUN TODAY IS DOUBLE FROM THEIR ERA.THE TOP GUYS REPRESENT TENNIS FAR MORE GRACEFULLY THAN STICH EVER DID,THEY WON'T LIE,THEY'RE FEELING THE INJURIES AND ARE CONCERNED.YOU CAN'T COMPARE THEM TO MIGRANT WORKERS.THEY ARE THE BEST IN THE WORLD AT WHAT THEY DO, SO THEY COMMAND THOSE SALARIES.STICH ONCE COMMENTED THAT SERENA WAS LAZY.SERENA REPLIED THAT HOW MANY SLAMS HE GOT?ASK STICHS PEERS,BECKER,SAMPRAS,COURIER,AGASSI.THEY UNDERSTAND WHAT THE TOP BOYS ARE SAYING.

      Tbla - 2011-09-24 09:45

      I wouldn't agree more with you there sierra mo. If you've played the game then you'll understand that these boys have upped the game and play more hours and tours than you can imagine. all great stars of yester years support them for sure. All the top 5 players currently are carrying injuries and one has seen them play match after match with those injuries.

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