National News

100 guilty in SWC courts

2010-07-05 21:52

Johannesburg - World Cup courts have found at least 100 people guilty of offences related to the soccer tournament, the National Prosecuting Authority said on Monday.

By Monday, the special World Cup Courts had dealt with 216 cases, said spokesperson Mthunzi Mhaga.

He said there were 13 pending trials, eight part-heard matters and 25 cases in need of further investigation.

Another 65 cases had been withdrawn - including those not placed on the court roll - three people had been found not guilty, and two warrants of arrest had been issued for people who had failed to appear in court.

"Prosecuting these cases has been a remarkable success if one has regard to this statistical account and the excellent work done by police, prosecutors as well as the court officials working in these courts," said Mhaga. "It is commendable."

He said the highest conviction rate was in South Gauteng, with 30, followed by the Western Cape, with 26.

"What is remarkable in the Western Cape is that there was not a single acquittal," he said.

There were no pending cases on the roll in Limpopo.

"If there is no case on the roll, this is an indication that all people are focusing on the beautiful soccer spectacular and nothing else," said Mhaga

 

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